Archery How To

TechXpert Articles & Videos

  1. Olympic Archery Explained: Draw Weight

    Olympic Archery Explained: Draw Weight

    There’s no question the archers who will compete in the Olympic games in Rio this summer are the best Olympic recurve archers their home countries have to offer. They train hard, shooting their bows for many hours every day. And they’ve been doing that for years. So it’s no stretch to think of these athletes as the strongest Olympic recurve...
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  2. Olympic Archery Explained: The Plunger

    Olympic Archery Explained: The Plunger

    Every archer you see shooting in the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro this summer will have a device on their bow called a plunger, or cushion plunger. It’s a small piece of gear that kind of looks like a spark plug, which works in concert with the arrow rest. And it’s absolutely critical to accuracy. The plunger is mounted...
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  3. What's the difference between Olympic recurve and recreational recurve?

    Summer is beginning, and archers are heading to their backyards to sling arrows. For many recreational archers, the bow of choice is the recurve. It’s fun and simple to shoot. The recurve also is the bow archers will be using in the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, this summer. But the recreational recurve and an Olympic recurve...
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  4. Olympic Archery Explained: The Clicker

    Olympic Archery Explained: The Clicker

    If you watch archery at the Olympics on TV this summer, you’re going to notice the clicker. Camera angles for archery competitions are usually the same, and so what you’ll see in closeup shots of archers drawing their bows is the arrow sitting on a rest through the draw cycle. There will be a thin blade of metal or carbon...
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  5. How to wax a bowstring and perform other basic string maintenance

    How to wax a bowstring and perform other basic string maintenance

    Think of your bowstring as the engine that drives your bow, whether it’s a compound, a recurve or a longbow. To get energy out of the bow to propel an arrow, you must put energy into it. And to do that, you have to draw the string. Photo by Jeff Sanchez – BowDoc Archery Your car engine needs regular maintenance...
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  6. Wrist and finger slings: Do I need one?

    Wrist and finger slings: Do I need one?

    Take a close look at an Olympic recurve archer, and you’ll likely notice a piece of cord tethering the forefinger to the thumb, around the back of the bow at the grip. You might see the same thing on the hand of a compound archer, although you’re more likely to spot a cord attached to the bow that encircles the...
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  7. What you need to know about archery tab faces

    What you need to know about archery tab faces

    Leather finger tabs have a couple different faces. When looking for one, recurve and longbow archers might find themselves asking, “Which tab face is right for me?” By the very nature of how they shoot, traditional and Olympic recurve archers have a much more intimate relationship with their bowstrings, as compared to compound archers. Recurves and longbows are shot by...
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  8. How to know if your bow's draw weight is too heavy

    How to know if your bow's draw weight is too heavy

    Are you drawing too much weight? Getting a bow with the right draw weight is an individual endeavor. Everybody's different. There is no prize awarded to the archer who draws the heaviest weight. The most obvious impact of having a bow with too much draw weight is that you can’t draw it at all. If you can’t get the string...
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  9. Feathers vs. vanes: Here's what you need to know

    Feathers vs. vanes: Here's what you need to know

    So you’ve got a fletching jig, and you’ve decided to build your own arrows for all your shooting needs – indoors, outdoor target, outdoor 3-D, hunting, etc. And now the question is…..Do I use feathers or vanes? According to the LAS TechXPert crew, there are many factors individual archers must consider in making such a determination, i.e., shooting style, venue...
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  10. A basic guide to arrow nocks

    A basic guide to arrow nocks

    It was in 1991 that the “Iceman” was discovered by hikers high up in the Italian Alps near the border with Austria. Among the artifacts recovered alongside his mummified corpse were an unfinished longbow, a quiver and a handful of arrows, only two of which were ready to be shot. They had leaf-shaped flint heads held in place within a...
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