Lancaster Archery TechXPerts P.J. Reilly and Justus Leimbach demonstrate the process for sighting in a bow. Once your bow is properly set up with a rest and sight, you've got to adjust the sight so that you can aim at a spot and put an arrow into it.

So let's say you start out to sight in your bow at 20 yards. You'll want to paste your sight pin - usually the top one on a multi-pin sight - on the bull's-eye and then shoot at least three arrows. You want to find out where your arrows group together. One arrow can be an anomaly, but if you've got three arrows in the same general area, then it's a safe bet that's your point of impact.

Adjust your sight to that group. To do that, your pin should follow the arrow. That is, if your group is high and to the right, then move your sight pin up and to the right to compensate. A common mistake is for an archer with that grouping to think his arrows need to go lower and to the left, so the sight should be moved down and left. That's incorrect.

Once you get your groups in the bull's-eye area, then it's time to shoot a lot of arrows to fine-tune your sight. Ideally, you want the center of your groups to be in the center of the bull's-eye. Once you've achieved that, you can shoot with confidence!

In the video, we use a compound bow, but the process is the same for sighting in a recurve bow that has a sight attached.